586-263-4411   Clinton Township
586-468-5445   Mount Clemens
586-275-3000   Sterling Heights

By Hosey Foot & Ankle Centers
October 05, 2018
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Heel Pain   Heel Spurs  

Have you been experiencing any heel pain or bothersome tenderness without any obvious cause? Although heel spurs themselves sometimes do not cause acute discomfort, they are frequently associated with the painful inflammation known as plantar fasciitis, a condition commonly described as feeling like a knife is wrenching through your foot. Read below for more information on the typical causes, symptoms, and treatments of heel spurs.

What is a Heel Spur?

A heel spur is often the result of overstraining foot muscles and ligaments, overstretching the plantar fascia (the thick band of tissue that connects the heel bone to the toes), and repeatedly tearing the heel bone membrane. From these actions arises a calcium deposit on the underside of the heel bone. Risk factor for developing the condition include:

  • Possessing any walking gait abnormalities

  • Regularly running or jogging on hard surfaces

  • Wearing poorly fitted or overly worn shoes

  • Wearing shoes that lack arch support

  • Being excessively overweight or obese

What are The Symptoms?

Heel spurs do not carry many symptoms by themselves. However, they are often related to other afflictions, most typically plantar fasciitis. The most common sign of this combo of conditions is a feeling of chronic pain along the bottom or back of the heel, especially during periods of walking, running, or jogging. If you are experiencing this recurring inflammation, it is a good idea to visit your local podiatrist's office and inquire about undergoing an x-ray or ultrasound examination of the foot.

What are the Treatment Options?

The solutions to heel spurs are generally centered around decreasing inflammation and avoiding re-injury. They include:

  • Applying ice on the inflammation

  • Performing stretch exercises

  • Wearing orthotic devices or shoe inserts to relieve pressure off of the spur

  • Taking anti-inflammatory medications such as ibuprofen to relieve pain

  • In extreme cases, surgery can be performed on chronically inflamed spurs

If you are dealing with symptoms of heel spurs or pain in your feet, turn to a podiatrist so that we can get you back on your feet. Don't ignore your pain.

By Hosey Foot & Ankle Centers
September 14, 2018
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Foot Pain   Custom Orthotics  

Custom orthotics are removable shoe inserts that provide greater arch support and stability to the feet and ankles. There are different types of orthotics available depending on the issue and level of support that is needed. Basic orthotics are sold over the counter, but a custom pair designed specifically for your foot will provide optimal support and comfort.

When are Custom Orthotics Necessary?

Podiatrists typically recommend custom orthotics for people with flat feet, or very high arches. One of the most common signs that you may benefit from a pair of orthotics is heel pain (although you may also experience pain and swelling in other parts of the foot). You may also experience pain and swelling after normal and relatively low impact activities like standing or walking.

A good way to figure out if you are having pronation issues is to examine the soles of your shoes and sneakers. If the soles and insoles tend to become visibly more worn on one side, it may be a sign that your alignment is off and you are over or under pronating. A podiatrist may ask you to walk in your bare feet to observe your stride and gait (known as a gait analysis). If you experience persistent pain, swelling, or stiffness, especially after exercise or after long periods of rest, schedule an appointment with a podiatrist.

Types of Custom Orthotics

There are a few different types of custom orthotics designs available depending on your needs.

Functional (also known as rigid) orthotics are made of harder materials and are usually prescribed for pronation problems or joint issues like arthritis.

Accommodative orthotics are designed to provide more cushioning and support and are typically prescribed for problems like plantar fasciitis and bunions.

In addition to improving your gait and foot and ankle alignment, custom orthotics can help to prevent related strains and injuries and relieve back, joint, and knee pain if it is caused by issues with your arches and pronation.

By Hosey Foot & Ankle Centers
September 04, 2018
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Arthritis  

Arthritis is a joint condition that affects roughly 54 million American adults according to the Arthritis Foundation. It can show up in joints all around the body, including the feet and toes. When the joints of the feet are affected by inflammation, it affects a patient’s ability to move their toes, bend their feet up or down, and turn on a dime when participating in athletic activities. Learn the steps that you can take to care for arthritic feet and improve your overall foot health.

Arthritis in the Feet
Arthritic joint pain, which is usually caused by an inflammatory reaction, is most commonly felt in the big toe, ankle, and the middle part of the foot. There are many different types of arthritis conditions that could affect the feet, including psoriatic, reactive, and rheumatoid arthritis. Osteoarthritis is the most common form—it is caused by the bones rubbing together, making the joints feel stiff and painful. Patients who are overweight are more likely to struggle with arthritic feet, as are seniors. Some people have had arthritis since childhood (juvenile arthritis or JA), making them more likely to develop foot deformities like bunions and struggle with swollen joints.

Arthritis Treatments
Though arthritis isn’t a curable condition, the symptoms can be eased with treatment so that you can continue to walk, jog, exercise, and work without debilitating pain. These are some of the ways your podiatrist may treat arthritis in the feet:

  • An X-ray or other imaging test to examine the condition of the joints.
  • Physical therapy exercises to make the joints more flexible.
  • Orthotic device or shoe for better foot support.
  • Joint injections (corticosteroids).
  • NSAID drugs (anti-inflammatories).
  • Surgery to remove inflamed tissue around the joints (Arthroscopic debridement) or fuse the bones (arthrodesis).

Caring for Your Feet
Seeing a foot doctor is an important part of caring for arthritic feet. But there are also some actions you can take at home to keep your feet and joints in good condition:

  • Get rid of shoes that put too much pressure on your joints, like high heels or sneakers that don’t support the ankles.
  • Soak your feet in warm water with Epsom salt and massage your feet when relaxing.
  • Commit to doing the toe and foot exercises suggested by your podiatrist.

Treating Arthritic Feet
Arthritic feet shouldn't prevent you from carrying on with normal life and physical activities. Get help from a podiatrist as soon as you start to experience symptoms and take extra steps to care for your feet.

By Hosey Foot & Ankle Centers
August 27, 2018
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Ingrown Toenail  

Ingrown Toenail TreatmentA throbbing, reddened toe. It happens if you don't attend to ingrown toenails (Onychocryptosis), a common foot ailment plaguing 18 percent of Americans 21 and older, says the Institute for Preventive Foot Health. At Hosey Foot & Ankle Centers in Sterling Heights, Clinton Township, and Mount Clemens, MI, your podiatrist will examine your foot and show you how to avoid and treat Onychocryptosis. Dr. Thomas Hosey, Dr. Ryan Murphy, and Dr. Kristen Patterson see the condition often, and they'll be happy to help.

What are ingrown toenails?

Usually, ingrown toenails occur at the corners of the big toes when the nail intrudes on the skin, becomes inflamed and gets very sore. While this problem may run in families because of inherited foot anatomy, elements of lifestyle frequently precipitate ingrown toenails. Plus, when ignored, these bothersome nails may become infected, a serious issue for diabetics and other people with suppressed immune systems or compromised peripheral circulation.

Precipitating factors include:

  • Tight, narrow, high-heeled footwear
  • Fungal toenail infection (Onychomycosis)
  • Socks which crowd or place pressure on the toes
  • Poor foot hygiene
  • Injury to the foot
  • Some foot deformities, including bunions
  • Cutting the toenail at an angle, rather than straight across, allowing the nail to penetrate the skin at the side of the toe
  • Arthritis
  • Diabetes

Treating an ingrown toenail

Many people try soaking their sore toes in warm water to alleviate the discomfort of ingrown toenails. Over-the-counter analgesics help, too, as does wearing more sensible shoes with plenty of room in the toe boxes.

However, your Sterling Heights, Clinton Township, and Mount Clemens podiatrists agree that persistent Onychocryptosis requires an in-office visit. Your doctor will look at your toe and employ the following interventions to correct the condition and help you feel better:

  • Trimming the toenail straight across
  • Prescribing an oral antibiotic if an infection is apparent
  • Removing a lateral portion of the nail via in-office surgery (partial nail avulsion) as needed

Your podiatrist also may advise better foot hygiene, changing socks daily and wearing shoes which do not rub on the nails. While some people continue to struggle with ingrown toenails, many find excellent symptom relief by using common sense foot care strategies and seeing their podiatrist on a routine basis.

How can we help?

At Hosey Foot & Ankle Centers, your podiatric health is our priority. Whatever your question or concern, we want to know about it, and we can help. If you have symptoms of an ingrown toenail, please make an appointment at one of our three locations so you can keep moving and feel great. In Clinton Township, phone (586) 263-4411. In Mount Clemens, phone (586) 468-5445, and for Sterling Heights, call (586) 275-3000.

By Hosey Foot & Ankle Centers
August 16, 2018
Category: Foot Condition
Tags: Poor Circulation  

Are you experiencing numbness, tingling, or discolorations in your feet?

Even though poor circulation isn’t a condition, if you are experiencing poor circulation in your feet this is often a symptom of a much larger issue. This is why it’s important to understand the warning signs of poor circulation and when to see a podiatrist, as many of these conditions can be serious or cause further complications to your health.

Causes of Poor Circulation

There are many reasons why someone may have poor circulation. The most common conditions include:

1. Peripheral artery disease (PAD)

This causes poor circulation in the legs due to a narrowing in the arteries and blood vessels. Over time this condition can cause damage to nerves or tissue. While this condition can occur in younger people, particularly smokers, it’s more common for people over 50 years old to develop PAD.

2. Blood Clots

A blood clot causes a block or restriction in blood flow and can develop anywhere in the body. The most common places for a blood clot include the arms or the legs, which can lead to symptoms of poor circulation. In some cases, a blood clot can cause serious complications such as a stroke.

3. Diabetes

While this condition does affect blood sugar levels, it is also known to affect circulation within the body. Those with circulation issues may experience cramping in the legs that may get worse when you are active. Those with diabetic neuropathy may experience nerve damage in the legs and feet, as well as numbness or tingling.

4. Raynaud’s Disease

A less common condition, Raynaud’s disease causes chronic cold fingers and feet due to the narrowing of the arteries in the hands and toes. Since these arteries are narrow it’s more difficult for blood to flow to these areas, leading to poor circulation. Of course, you may experience these symptoms in other parts of the body besides your toes or fingers, such as your nose, ears, or lips.

Warning Signs of Poor Circulation

You may be experiencing poor circulation in your feet if you are experiencing these symptoms:

  • Numbness
  • Pain that may radiate into the limbs
  • Tingling (a “pins and needles” sensation)
  • Muscle cramping

If you are experiencing symptoms of poor circulation that don’t go away it’s best to play it safe rather than sorry and turn to a podiatric specialist who can provide a proper diagnosis and determine the best approach for improving circulation. Don’t ignore this issue.





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Hosey Foot & Ankle Centers - Clinton Township

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Clinton Township, MI Podiatrist
Hosey Foot & Ankle Centers
42550 Garfield Road
Clinton Township, MI 48038
(586) 263-4411
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Sterling Heights, MI Podiatrist
Hosey Foot & Ankle Centers
44344 Dequindre Road
Sterling Heights, MI 48314
(586) 275-3000
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Mount Clemens, MI Podiatrist
Hosey Foot & Ankle Centers
253 Southbound Gratiot Ave.
Mount Clemens, MI 48043
(586) 468-5445
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