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Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction

Hosey and Murphy Foot & Ankle Centers

Podiatrists located in Clinton Township, MI & Sterling Heights, MI

If your arches have dropped and you have foot pain, it could be due to posterior tibial tendon dysfunction. The expert podiatrists at Hosey and Murphy Foot & Ankle Centers diagnose and treat posterior tibial tendon dysfunction at their multiple locations in Clinton Township, Sterling Heights, and Mount Clemens, Michigan. Call Hosey and Murphy Foot & Ankle Centers or schedule a consultation online today for expert podiatry care.

Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction Q&A

What is posterior tibial tendon dysfunction?

Your posterior tibial tendon attaches your calf muscles to the bones inside your foot. It holds up the arch of your foot and supports your foot while you walk or run. However, when your posterior tibial tendon is inflamed or torn, it can’t function normally. 

Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction is usually due to overuse and repetitive strain on the tendon. It usually develops gradually, and your symptoms may be worse after walking, running, hiking, or even climbing stairs.

What are the warning signs of posterior tibial tendon dysfunction?

The symptoms of posterior tibial tendon dysfunction usually develop slowly. You might begin with pain and swelling in your ankle or the arch of your foot. This then progresses to your arch flattening and developing flatfoot. As your arch flattens, your pain is primarily on the inside of your foot, ankle, and arch. However, posterior tibial tendon dysfunction can progress even more, causing your ankle to roll inward and your toes to turn outward. 

How is posterior tibial tendon dysfunction diagnosed?

If you have pain on the inside of your foot or ankle, make an appointment with the experts at Hosey and Murphy Foot & Ankle Centers. If you continue to walk or train with posterior tibial tendon dysfunction, your risk of more severe foot and ankle problems increases.

Your podiatrist examines your foot and ankle, checking for swelling, warmth, and weakness, especially along the arch of your foot. They might order an X-ray or MRI to examine the tendons, ligaments, and bones in your ankle and foot in more detail.

What are the conservative treatments for posterior tibial tendon dysfunction?

The team of expert podiatrists at Hosey and Murphy Foot & Ankle Centers begin with conservative treatments for posterior tibial tendon dysfunction and try to avoid surgery. For example, they might recommend:

  • Bracing 
  • Orthotic devices
  • Immobilization with a cast or boot
  • Physical therapy
  • Anti-inflammatory medication
  • Changing your shoes


However, if you have advanced posterior tibial tendon dysfunction or nonsurgical treatments aren’t effective, your podiatrist can perform surgery to repair your tendon.

If you’re concerned about ankle and arch pain, call Hosey and Murphy Foot & Ankle Centers or make an appointment online today.